Venus Munroe

Significance: 

Enslaved women in Lexington could and did have their children

taken away and sold as property. Margaret Tulip and Venus

Munroe were women who were considered property rather than

free people, and both were separated from their mothers.

Margaret was brought to Lexington, Venus was taken from

Lexington. To date, research has found many enslaved

Lexington women, including: Peggy, Violet, Dinah, Lucy,

Charity, Deborah, Pegg, Zilpah, Betty, Phillis, Margaret and

Floral. Research continues.

Birth: 

Death:

Between 1744 and 1754

Jan 22, 1844

Burlington Vital Records, 1799-1844, entry

Obituary:

Marriage:

No

Children:

No

Places Lived:

With Munroe family to about 3, Lexington

James and Margery Reed, Burlington/Woburn

Captain James Reed, Burlington/ Woburn

Unknown household, Lexington (3 months, between 1783 and 1790)

Margery Reed, Burlington/Woburn

James Reed, Jr. Burlington/Woburn

Connection to Lexington:

Born in Lexington, probably into Munroe family

Wikipedia: 

No

Book Titles:

Education:

Employment:

Michael Canavan Papers, 1868

Charles Hudson, History of the Town of Lexington, 1913

George Perkins, Stones Stand, Waters Flow, a New England Story, July, 2007

John Fogelberg, Burlington: Part of a Greater Chronicle, 1776

Samuel Sewall, The History of Woburn, 1868

None

Servant to Reed family, age three to 100 (or 90 possibly) Burlington

Quotation:

None

Link to page in Notable American Women:  

None

Inclusion in the Lexington
Historical Society Exhibit?  

Yes

Additional Info:

Antiracism Committee of Follen Church, UU,“Slavery in Colonial Lexington,” 2020; 

Anne Grady, “A History of Slavery in  Lexington Overview,” 2021

Preliminary Sketch
- Meredith Bergmann
Venus Munroe