Caroline Wellington

Significance: 

In 1887 Caroline Wellington echoed the voice of the Mothers of the Revolution when the Lexington Women’s Suffrage League created a banner that proclaimed, “Something Must Be Done.” Caroline and her sister carried forward her mother’s advocacy work on the League’s Executive Committee. In 1913,

Caroline passed the banner to Vera P. Lane to carry in the

Women’s March in Washington, D.C. It was another 7 years

before the 19th Amendment recognized women’s suffrage.

Caroline represents the multi-generational pursuit of equal

suffrage and the power of petitions, bazaars and banners.

Birth: 

Death:

3 Dec 1820

16 Mar 1916

Obituary:

Marriage:

None

Children:

None

Places Lived:

Lexington, MA

Connection to Lexington:

From the obituary: Miss Wellington was a resident of Lexington all her life and was a member of the Lexington Historical Society and the Lexington Equal Suffrage League.

Wikipedia: 

Book Titles:

Education:

Employment:

Quotation:

Link to page in Notable American Women:  

Inclusion in the Lexington
Historical Society Exhibit?  

Additional Info:

References: Obituary, Boston Herald, Saturday March 18, 1916; Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1850; Ancestry.com censuses and city directories.


In the 1910 census, Caroline was 89 and was living at 12 Clarke St with her sisters Eliza Wellington (86) and Louise Peaslee (76) and a servant Ella Rogers (58)

Preliminary Sketch
- Meredith Bergmann
Caroline Wellington