Eliza Follen

Significance: 

Author and abolitionist Eliza Cabot Follen employed empathy to communicate moral messages to youth and adults. She

encouraged Lexington women to become activists, telling Julia Robbins: “abolition is women’s work.” Her literary works ranged from her whimsical version of “The Three Little Kittens” to her urgent essay “To Mothers in the Free States.” Eliza represents the power of women’s voice and the power of the pen.

Birth: 

Death:

August 15, 1787

January 26, 1860 

Obituary:

Marriage:

Charles Follen ​​(m. 1828; died 1840)

Children:

Charles Christopher Follen

Places Lived:

Lexington, MA

Connection to Lexington:

Wikipedia: 

Book Titles:

Education:

Employment:

She was well-educated

Quotation:

Link to page in Notable American Women:  

Inclusion in the Lexington
Historical Society Exhibit?  

Additional Info:

She was a voluminous writer. Her poems were first published at Boston (Crosby & Co.).  She was an American writer, editor, and abolitionist.

Preliminary Sketch
- Meredith Bergmann
Eliza Follen